July 16, 2011

Original Missed Encounters postcards. These were done before I started the course in the summer of 2010. 

The idea was to leave messages in public places that people would have the chance to respond to in whatever way they saw fit. Rather than using a postcard to bridge distance and time as is the case with most ‘normal’ postcards, I wanted to emphasise the possibilities and constant succession of missed encounters that make up day to day life. 

July 16, 2011

Paper boat performance I did in the autumn of last year (2010).

On reflection this is probably my favourite thing from the entire portfolio course. Having said that, I think stumbling upon the idea was more luck that considered development, but now the course is over that doesn’t matter!

The things I want to take from it are the performance element, the repetitive action of making the boats, the chance aspect of submitting a regulated form to unpredictable process, and actually, the lyricism and romanticism that comes through. 

I think for the time being I’m going to stick to playing about with paper in its various forms.

July 16, 2011
after the event

Well, the course has finished and I’m still doing a bit of work here and there.

My plan was to start a new blog for anything that I might do, but it seems silly to throw all of this away so I’m just going to keep developing what’s here. In lieu of an entirely new blog, I’ve changed the theme so at least it looks a bit fresh and new.

Now that the course is over I can include a few bits of older work that, looking back on them, seem especially relevent to the areas I want to develop now. So hang on in there and some new things might appear after that…

July 16, 2011
Marcia Hafif, January 01, 1972.
How stupidly relevent is this to the marks I was making in the drawings from the Old House? 
Unsurprisingly, I found it in the catalogue for the exhibition ‘Afterimage: Drawing Through Process’ (LA MOCA, 1999). I was always aware that my work was primarily process related but never expected to find something quite so similar! The catalogue as a whole is amazing and has a couple of excellent essays about drawing and temporality. 
Hafif simply titles her drawings by the day and time they were done, so the marks become a representation of that time. 
I initially panicked when I saw them because of the amazing similarity, but actually I think mine are considerably different. Whereas Hafif’s seem to record her personal relationship with the pencil and paper during the time she was drawing, mine combines that with the dialogue and text from the environment I was working in. And actually, I think it will be the link to dialogue and text that will prove more fruitful for me. 

Marcia Hafif, January 01, 1972.

How stupidly relevent is this to the marks I was making in the drawings from the Old House? 

Unsurprisingly, I found it in the catalogue for the exhibition ‘Afterimage: Drawing Through Process’ (LA MOCA, 1999). I was always aware that my work was primarily process related but never expected to find something quite so similar! The catalogue as a whole is amazing and has a couple of excellent essays about drawing and temporality. 

Hafif simply titles her drawings by the day and time they were done, so the marks become a representation of that time. 

I initially panicked when I saw them because of the amazing similarity, but actually I think mine are considerably different. Whereas Hafif’s seem to record her personal relationship with the pencil and paper during the time she was drawing, mine combines that with the dialogue and text from the environment I was working in. And actually, I think it will be the link to dialogue and text that will prove more fruitful for me. 

June 26, 2011
"Above all else, it is about leaving a mark that I existed: I was here. I was hungry. I was defeated. I was happy. I was sad. I was in love. I was afraid. I was hopeful. I had an idea and I had a good purpose and that’s why I made works of art."

— Felix Gonzalez-Torres

June 24, 2011
"Don’t start from the good old things but the bad new ones."

— Bertolt Brecht

June 24, 2011
Gone.

Gone.

June 24, 2011

Exhibition installation v2.0.

June 17, 2011
please disregard

the following. I wasn’t going to publish it but I need to try and use it for some positive reflection. 

I only posted today that I was concerned that the show had too many elements and that perhaps it needed stripping down a bit. After the private view I’m almost convinced that I’m right. I’d like to say it was the fault of the visitors but I’m the person that displayed the work as it is and it’s obviously not done it many favours. 

I really struggled watching people do one (or all) of the following things. a) Popping their head around the corner and moving on. b)  Scanning what was on the wall and moving on. c) Telling me how terribly conceptual it is. 

I honestly don’t see it as being particularly conceptual. Conceptual Art in the strictest sense is art in which the idea is more important than the outcome. Outside of this all art is conceptual to some degree in the sense there is always a motivation behind it. 

I wouldn’t call what I’ve done in the college “Conceptual Art” because what is hung on the wall is far more important to me than the idea behind it. The concept was simply a series of representations of a space and period of time. 

I don’t see the overarching idea as even being particularly important in looking at the work. I suppose my only question would be: do you find something in the marks that is of interest to you? Do you find them beautiful?

People seemed to prefer to cast around for the “grand plan” so that they could feel the piece was seen and understood and therefore able to be moved on from. 

I should emphasise that I feel I’m to blame for this. All of the extra elements play up the idea of concept and I now see it was a mistake. If I could completely redo the whole thing it would just be the drawings and the graphs. And perhaps the sound.

I don’t know - at what point does conceptual become Conceptual?

June 17, 2011
all watched over by machines of loving grace

is a fascinating series of documentaries by Adam Curtis that’s on iPlayer.

For my part, I’m less than enamoured of the machines after some fairly spectacular technological failures at the private view this evening. Projector - dead. 

After some rescue attempts with a replacement I’m not sure what I’m going to do. If I was of the right temperament I’d probably just cry. That and a few other things made this evening pretty hard. 

Anyway, I don’t want to give up so I’m trying to reconfigure the display in a way that will work. I don’t want to rely on something as complex as a slide projector, because should anymore problems arise I’d like to be able to sort them out easily.

So I’ve had to do some thinking. I’ve got a tracing paper wall which I’d rather not tear down. I had the projector for the beam of light and the sound. So how can I get those two things but in a different way?

My aim is to try and backlight the tracing paper so you get more of the shadows of people inside cast onto it. I was never very happy that this didn’t work with the projector beause it’s beam is so focused so I need to try and see this as a positive. A series of lamps or something should work. So I’m frantically investigating. 

And sound. Well I’ve already got mechanical clocks and kitchen timers so one of those should suffice. Watch this space.

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